Keeping the Goliardic Spark Alive #amwriting #NaNoWriMo by Connie J. Jasperson

Medieval Monday will be back next week! Like Connie, I am also making a last push for my NaNoWriMo word count, so today I’m sharing a post instead of writing one. (Thanks to Chris the Story Reading Ape.)


This week has been a struggle, what with cooking a Thanksgiving feast for my extended family and trying to keep my wordcount output up for #NaNoWriMo, so today I am reprising an essay written in 2015, on irreverent humor, the Carmina Burana, and medieval frat boys. Enjoy!

Crazy humor at the expense of the establishment is nothing new. It’s part of the Human Condition. And to that end, I love goliardic poetry.

Carl Orff and his amazing cantata, Carmina Burana, catapulted me into the poetry of the Goliards. But who and what were the goliards?

During what we call the Middle Ages, noble and wealthy middle-class families had a tradition that the eldest son inherited everything, the second son went into the church, and the younger sons went to the crusades.

The old-fashioned practice of “primogeniture” or bestowing the rights of inheritance upon the eldest son, often leaving younger sons penniless, is responsible for some of the most ribald and hilarious poetry of the middle ages…

Keep reading at the source: Keeping the Goliardic Spark Alive #amwriting #NaNoWriMo

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