Fill up your e-reader with FREE books!

One of the benefits I offer my newsletter subscribers is sharing links to free book promotions where readers can discover new authors and find fun stuff to read. As much as possible, I only join and include promos with books that are relatively clean (no suggestive covers allowed, etc.) While I can’t vouch for every single book in each promo, I’ve tried my best.

There are a lot of good ones running right now, so I thought I’d share them this week with my blog followers as well. Just click on the images below to check out each promotion. Get these books free while you can!

Want to get notified of book promotions like these every month? Just subscribe to my author newsletter.  Check out my most recent newsletter, “Weaving Mystery Threads“.

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Inspiration Sunday!

 

Therefore, since we have a great high priest who has ascended into heaven, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith we profess. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are–yet he did not sin. Let us then approach God’s throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.

Hebrews 4:14-16

Medieval Monday: 7 Things You Didn’t Know a Medieval Princess Could Do

I stumbled on another great article last week and thought I would share it for my Medieval Monday post.  If you go through this and just skim the 7 headers for the quick answers, you’ll really miss out. The most interesting part of this is in the detailed accounts of specific princesses in history; their circumstances…and eccentricities. Once again, real history is anything but boring!


7 things you didn’t know a medieval princess could do

Many fairy tales tell us that princesses spent years confined to towers waiting for knights to rescue them, little more than decorative pawns to be traded by their father. But the lives of historical princesses paint a very different picture. Here, through the lives of the five daughters of Edward I, historian Kelcey Wilson-Lee shares seven lessons on what it was to be a real medieval princess…

#1 Medieval princesses could command a castle

In 1293, Eleanor, the eldest daughter of Edward I, married Henri, the ruler of the small province of Bar in present-day northern France. Four years later, Henri was fighting near Lille when he was captured by hostile French forces and taken as a prisoner to Paris. With her husband imprisoned, responsibility for securing the county fell to Eleanor. As the 14th-century writer Christine de Pisan wrote, a princess should “know how to use weapons… so that she may be ready to command her men if need arises”. Eleanor marshalled what remained of Henri’s army to defend her home – the castle at Bar – and wrote to her father and other allies to raise money for Henri’s ransom, successfully safeguarding the inheritance of her young children.

Almost 30 years earlier, another princess named Eleanor held Dover Castle against her own brother, King Henry III, for several months during the uprising led by her husband, the rebel baron Simon de Montfort. After the decisive battle at Evesham, in which Eleanor’s husband and eldest son were killed, the tireless princess nevertheless fought on, bringing in a siege engine to defend the castle and using its coastal position to ship her younger children abroad with money for their upkeep.

#2 Medieval princesses could marry for love

Joan of Acre, Edward’s second daughter, first married at the age of 18 to a much older man – Gilbert de Clare, a 46-year-old divorcee who was a troublesome magnate within her father’s kingdom. When he died five years later, his widow found herself extremely eligible: young, proven fertile (as a mother of four), and in sole possession of one of England’s most valuable estates. Coupled with her royal connections, the princess proved a strong temptation to powerful European rulers and could easily have found herself consort at a rich court far from England.

But Joan had fallen in love, with a dashing but landless young man in her deceased husband’s retinue named Ralph de Monthermer. Determined not to be parted from her lover, Joan married Ralph in a secret ceremony that contravened her vow of homage to her father (rich widows who held land directly from the monarch needed the king’s permission to remarry, since their new husbands would be empowered through control of their estates). The king was livid, but eventually he forgave his headstrong daughter, who managed to keep her estates and independent income, as well as the man she loved.

Read #s 3-7 at: https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/princesses-what-life-like-middle-ages-daughters-edward-i-eleanor-joan-acre/


Use the Medieval Monday Index to discover other topics relating to daily life in the Middle Ages.

 

Inspiration Sunday!

Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have gained access by faith into this grace in which we now stand. And we boast in the hope of the glory of God. Not only so, but we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope. And hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us.

Romans 5:1-5

What’s New Wednesday: Spring Cleaning…the fun kind

Now that Shards of Faith is done and published (yay!) I can get down to some series spring cleaning while I gather ideas together for the next book. What does that mean exactly?

Well, for starters I am re-editing Journey to Aviad, because it has needed that for a long time. In working on that project, I can really see how much Elowyn has grown, and how I’ve grown with her. You can read more about that in my most recent newsletter, which incidentally is a great place to find lots of free books. So if you’re not subscribed yet, check it out.

Series spring cleaning doesn’t stop there.

Did you know I’ve already created a large timeline that details all the major events in my world’s history, starting right from the Creation story? Now I need a new one that contains all the more current events in my books, from the new novella (which takes place in the past), all the way through Visions of Light and Shadow. Instead of showing events by the year, it will zoom much closer in to view things down to the hour, or even minute if I want it to.

I’m using a program called AEON Timeline, and it’s the best way for me to keep the details straight, because at this point there’s an awful lot of information for me to just remember in my head! Once this monumental task is done, I’ll be able to see how old each character is and where they are located at any given point. I will be able to identify and group story arcs, and visually see where subplots overlap and connect with each other.

As you can see from the image above, I’ve started this new timeline already, but completing it is going to take a while. It will be so worth it though! It’s already fun to see how things intertwine, particularly with Journey to Aviad and Into the Shadow Wood, which take place in the same time period.

While I’m doing this, I’ll also be taking  LOTS of notes–looking for plot threads I’ve started but not tied off yet, and getting ideas together for new short stories, novellas, and of course series books. All of this is gearing me up for another Camp NaNoWriMo session in April. As you can see, a writer’s work is never done. I’ve got even more on my plate now than I did while I was working on Shards of Faith.

I do have to take breaks every now and then so my head doesn’t explode. When I can’t stare at my computer screen anymore, I’m getting a bit of quilting done. But I’ll save that for another post.

Medieval Monday: Medieval Nun Fakes her own Death

Whoever thinks history is boring obviously hasn’t read stories like these! It’s too bad we don’t know how things turned out for the wayward nun, but maybe this little glimpse into the past could inspire some writer out there to tell their own version of who she was, why she left, and how she lived out the rest of her days. Melton’s perspective is interesting too, especially since he has quite a story all his own. Is he a villain in this real life drama, or is he correct in his assessment of her character? I guess we’ll never know for sure…


Archive shows medieval nun faked her own death to escape convent

Archbishop’s register reveals how Joan of Leeds crafted a dummy of her body that was buried, while she pursued ‘the way of carnal lust’.

A team of medieval historians working in the archives at the University of York has found evidence that a nun in the 14th century faked her own death and crafted a dummy “in the likeness of her body” in order to escape her convent and pursue – in the words of the archbishop of the time – “the way of carnal lust”.

A marginal note written in Latin and buried deep within one of the 16 heavy registers used by to record the business of the archbishops of York between 1304 and 1405 first alerted archivists to the adventures of the runaway nun. “To warn Joan of Leeds, lately nun of the house of St Clement by York, that she should return to her house,” runs the note written by archbishop William Melton and dated to 1318.

Melton, writing to inform the Dean of Beverley about the “scandalous rumour” he had heard about the arrival of the Benedictine nun Joan, claimed that Joan had “impudently cast aside the propriety of religion and the modesty of her sex”, and “out of a malicious mind simulating a bodily illness, she pretended to be dead, not dreading for the health of her soul, and with the help of numerous of her accomplices, evildoers, with malice aforethought, crafted a dummy in the likeness of her body in order to mislead the devoted faithful and she had no shame in procuring its burial in a sacred space amongst the religious of that place”.

After faking her own death, he continued, “and, in a cunning, nefarious manner … having turned her back on decency and the good of religion, seduced by indecency, she involved herself irreverently and perverted her path of life arrogantly to the way of carnal lust and away from poverty and obedience, and, having broken her vows and discarded the religious habit, she now wanders at large to the notorious peril to her soul and to the scandal of all of her order.”

Professor Sarah Rees Jones, principal investigator on the project, said the story of Joan’s escape, which she and her team discovered last week, was “extraordinary – like a Monty Python sketch”.

Continue reading: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/feb/11/archive-shows-medieval-nun-faked-her-own-death-to-escape-convent


Use the Medieval Monday Index to discover other topics relating to daily life in the Middle Ages.

 

Inspiration Sunday!

When you feel distressed about all the troubles of this world, just remember that a happy ending has been promised to those who remain faithful. If this is not the ultimate inspiration, I don’t know what is!

Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb down the middle of the great street of the city. On each side of the river stood the tree of life, bearing twelve crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations. No longer will there be any curse. The throne of God and of the Lamb will be in the city, and his servants will serve him. They will see his face, and his name will be on their foreheads. There will be no more night. They will not need the light of a lamp or the light of the sun, for the Lord God will give them light. And they will reign for ever and ever.

Revelation 22: 1-5 (Eden Restored)