Medieval Monday: The Philosopher

It’s the beginning of the month, so here’s another episode of Medieval Lives with Terry Jones of Monty Python fame. He talks about the medieval philosopher, which was really more of a scientist or alchemist, and also about the medieval physician. Were they really as backward thinking as we suppose? Or were the seeds that eventually grew into the age of Enlightenment planted during this era? There is some fascinating stuff in this episode, including why people in the Middle Ages were so preoccupied with the idea of changing other metals into gold–it’s not for the reason you might think!


Learn more about the daily life in Middle Ages by browsing previous posts in the Medieval Monday Index.

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My New Book Has Finally Arrived!

visions of light and shadow

You’ve been waiting patiently, and now it’s here–book 3 of the Wind Rider Chronicles!
Get a discounted price by buying direct   |   Amazon  |   BN   |  Kobo   |  Other  


It has been six months since Cailean’s death, and Elowyn can’t get his special clifftop in the mountains out of her thoughts…or her dreams. Something is drawing her there, despite the danger, and time is running out. The new spring growth is threatening to cover what’s left of his foot trail forever, but getting there is going to be more challenging than she imagined, especially with the thieves still lurking along the mining road.

Morganne is having difficulties of her own. The monks are making plans to send the tomes away, Braeden’s tax demands are increasing yet again, and Morganne’s once prosperous shop has been noticeably empty. On top of that, the Kinship is getting ready to leave Minhaven—seemingly for good this time.

With political unrest building, and the Black Shrine still intact, Glak and Bane want the girls to go with them. Elowyn is eager to leave her sorrows behind, certain that Aviad is calling them to follow the road beyond Minhaven, but Morganne isn’t so sure. She’s not ready to abandon everything they know for an uncertain future, and Elowyn finds herself at a crossroads. Will she be able to convince Morganne that it’s Aviad’s voice she is hearing, or will she be forced to go on alone?

Get it today at your favorite ebook retailer. (Print copies will be available soon.)

 

 

Fantasy Art Friday

Get inspired with this week’s Fantasy Art Friday, where fun fantasy artwork is combined with a writing prompt to get your creative juices flowing.


In this pristine, untouched landscape flows a river of fire. It is said that from it one of humankind’s greatest enemies–the dragon–was raised. Born from fire, they do not fear it, but instead wield it as a weapon. All but the bravest and the most foolish live in fear of their reign over these mountains.

But the river of fire is also the key to their defeat. It is said that any blade or arrow tip forged from the river’s heat, then cooled in the frigid waters at its end, are strong enough to fatally pierce a dragon’s thick hide.

Beware to those who dare seek out this place of legend, for it is carefully guarded. Many have tried, and most have failed. The heat of the river is not the only challenge you’ll find waiting…

Artwork by A. Rocha


Want to see more Fantasy Art posts? Find them here.

 

 

Fantasy Art Friday

Get inspired with this week’s Fantasy Art Friday, where fun fantasy artwork is combined with a writing prompt to get your creative juices flowing.


A cavernous opening yawns in the mountainside, beckoning the brave and the foolish to enter. Above it hangs the ominous carving of a dragon–perhaps a warning as to what lurks in the shadows beyond. Will you dare to cross the rickety wooden bridge and test your fate? If so, what do you find on the other side?

Title and Artist Unknown


Want to see more Fantasy Art posts? Find them here.

 

 

Medieval Monday: The Knight

It’s the beginning of the month, so here’s another episode of Medieval Lives with Terry Jones of Monty Python fame. He talks about the evolving role of knights in medieval society and the emergence of a code of chivalry. Sadly legend and reality are two very different things! There is also an interesting section on horses and how they were trained to be used as weapons on the battlefield. Additionally, he talks about coats of arms and learns what his own might look like. It’s actually pretty funny. So enjoy this episode of Medieval Lives.


Learn more about the daily life in Middle Ages by browsing previous posts in the Medieval Monday Index.

Medieval Monday: Undergarments

This may seem like a strange little topic, but it came up this week as a curiosity question I wanted answered for my new work-in-progress. What was meant to be a quick search, for a quick and easy answer, turned out to be more interesting than I anticipated. Today I’ll be sharing a post instead of making my own because this site really did a good job of addressing the topic. I hope you’ll click and read the whole thing through–I was surprised at how much I didn’t know!


What Underwear Was Like in Medieval Times by Melissa Snell

What did medieval men wear under their clothes? Medieval women?

In imperial Rome, both men and women were known to wear simply wrapped loin-cloths, probably made from linen, under their outer garments. In addition, women might wear a breast band called a strophiumor mamillare, made from linen or leather. There was, of course, no universal rule in undergarments; people wore what was comfortable, available, or necessary for modesty — or nothing at all. Individuals competing in sports, like the women depicted in the mosaic shown here, would have benefited from confining garments.

It’s entirely possible that the use of these undergarments continued into medieval times (especially the strophium, or something similar), but there is little direct evidence to support this theory. People didn’t write much about their underwear, and natural (as opposed to synthetic) cloth doesn’t usually survive for more than a few hundred years. Therefore, most of what historians know about medieval undergarments has been pieced together from period artwork and the occasional archaeological find.

One such archaeological find took place in an Austrian castle in 2012. A cache of feminine delicates was preserved in a sealed-off vault, and the items included garments very similar to modern-day brassieres and underpants. This exciting find in medieval underwear revealed that such garments were in use as far back as the 15th century. The question remains as to whether they were used in earlier centuries, and if it was only the privileged few who could afford them.

In addition to loincloths, medieval men were known to wear an entirely different type of underpants.

Underpants

Medieval men’s underpants were fairly loose drawers known as braies, breeks,or breeches. Varying in length from upper-thigh to below the knee, braies could be closed with a drawstring at the waist or cinched with a separate belt around which the top of the garment would be tucked. Braies were usually made of linen, most likely in its natural off-white color, but they could also be sewn from finely woven wool, especially in colder climes.

In the Middle Ages, braies were not only used as underwear, they were frequently worn by laborers with little else when doing hot work. Those depicted here fell well below the knees, but were tied to the wearer’s waist to keep them out of the way.

No one really knows whether or not medieval women wore underpants before the 15th century. Since the dresses medieval women wore were so long, it could be very inconvenient to remove underwear when answering nature’s call; on the other hand, some form of snug underpants could make life a little easier once a month. There’s no evidence one way or the other, so it’s entirely possible that, at times, medieval women wore loincloths or short braies. We just don’t know for sure.

Keep Reading Here: https://www.thoughtco.com/medieval-underwear-1788621


Learn more about the daily life in Middle Ages by browsing previous posts in the Medieval Monday Index.

Fantasy Art Friday

Get inspired with this week’s Fantasy Art Friday, where fun fantasy artwork is combined with a writing prompt to get your creative juices flowing.


She stands at the water’s edge…waiting. Waves swirl and churn against the rocks, sending up spray that leaves glistening beads on her hair and clothes. In the distance, dark clouds begin to gather over the water and the wind picks up. The pungent salt-smell of the sea mingles with the scent of the coming rain. Let it fall. Her legs are planted firmly against the stone beneath her feet as she grips her staff tightly in hand. She will continue to wait until the dark of night and the encroaching tide force her to retreat. What is she waiting for? Something that will come to her across the water…or up from its murky depths?

Title and Artist Unknown


Want to see more Fantasy Art posts? Find them here.