#WordlessWednesday ~ Random Images #Photography

I love getting glimpses of beautiful and interesting places I’d probably never see otherwise.

Between the Lines ~ Books’n’Stuff

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A Thousand Miles of History XVIII: The path through the sea…

Can’t go to this amazing place in person? Sue Vincent provides the next best thing! Enjoy this amazing visual and historical tour.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

The tide was still in when we reached Marazion, and yet a line of people snaked between the shore and the island half a mile into the sea, seemingly walking on water. We were going to join them, walking the old pilgrim route to St Michael’s Mount, one of the first points on the Michael Line, that runs from the westernmost tip of the land to its eastern shores.

The Mount rises from the sea topped with a fairytale castle and is now completely cut-off from the mainland. The castle, like the island, has belonged to the St Aubyn family since around 1650, although it has been gifted to the nation, the family still lives there and manages the mount and the tiny village at its feet. Aside from the thousands of visitors, it is a peaceful place, though it has not always been so, and for a thousand years…

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How to Pick a Character’s Name

Andrea Lundgren

This is part of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group blog-hop, designed to help encourage authors and foster discussions about writing topics across the internet and the world. This month’s question is “What’s harder for you to come up with, book titles or character names

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For me, it’s definitely coming up with a book title. Because I’m primarily writing a series, I want the titles to all work together, to where they sound like they’re part of a “family” of books. And then, I want them to be memorable, to not be something already used by another writer (at least, not on the blockbuster level). I don’t want to be one of 5 or 10 authors who wrote a book by the same name if possible.

By comparison, coming up with names is simple. I usually start with a feel for who the character is, what sort of person…

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Tools of Medieval Wisdom Unearthed Beneath England’s Ancient Academic Hub

Archaeologists in England have unearthed in excess of 10,000 medieval artifacts in central Oxford and every single one of them is providing a clearer picture of day to day life at Oxford University, as it was seven centuries ago.

Oxford University has become England’s academic pulsing heart, but it began as part of a friary established by Franciscan friars in 1224, known as Greyfriars. The massive archaeological dig is being directed by archaeologist, Ben Ford of the heritage consultancy, Oxford Archaeology, who told reporters at The Independent, among the smaller finds were “writing equipment, refectory cutlery and even ceramic beer mugs used by students and teachers back in the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.” They also recovered “Ultra-rare octagonal oak columns, possibly from the friary’s 13th century timber church,” and a “beautiful mediaeval tiled pavement from the friary… discovered very near the new Westgate shopping center in central Oxford, archaeologists told reporters.”

According to the archeological report the dig has unearthed the iron knives and spoons, for consuming potage and broth. The recent finds tell archaeologists that Oxford’s medieval scholars ate a very wide range of terrestrial sourced foods including “meat, eggs, cereals, mutton, lamb, pork, beef, chicken and geese.” Sea fish included cod, whiting, haddock, herring, eel, gurnard, conger, grey mullet, thornback ray, salmon and sea trout, and archaeologists reported that among the freshwater fish eaten were roach and dace. A microscopic examination of all the food remains and radiocarbon dating will begin shortly.

Read the rest of this interesting article on the Ancient Origins website.

Short Story Writing Contest! $250 Cash and Prizes Worth Over $3,200

(Posted on Into the Writer Lea by Andrea Lundgren)

Hi all! I’m excited to announce A Writer’s Path’s first writing contest. We have an excellent panel of 5 judges and 6 sponsors, and we’re looking to make this a large event.

Writing contests are a great way to gain experience and have the possibility of winning cash and prizes. For the winners, it’s also a great thing to add to your writing resume.

Prizes:

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via Short Story Writing Contest! $250 Cash and Prizes Worth Over $3,200