Medieval Monday: Squires Training

Rags-to-riches, the classic hero’s journey. But how did a boy truly become a knight? What hardships and responsibilities did he face? Could just anyone become a knight and if so, how did he prove his worth?


Use the Medieval Monday Index to discover other topics relating to daily life in the Middle Ages.

Inspiration Sunday!

In the past God spoke to our ancestors through the prophets at many times and in various ways, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, and through whom also he made the universe. The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact representation of his being, sustaining all things by his powerful word. After he had provided purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty in heaven. So he became as much superior to the angels as the name he has inherited is superior to theirs.

Hebrews 1:1-4

 

Fantasy Art Friday

Get inspired with this week’s Fantasy Art Friday, where fun fantasy artwork is combined with a writing prompt to get your creative juices flowing.


The existence of this pool seems nothing short of miraculous. Aside from rain, what could be feeding it so high up on that tower of rock? I imagine this would be a place of pilgrimage, where the waters of this hard-to-reach place are surrounded by speculation and myth. Perhaps they heal, or impart hidden knowledge. They could be transformative, changing one substance, or being, into another. Could it be that in the pool’s reflective surface you can see things beyond normal human sight? Or the water might serve as a hidden gateway from one realm to another. Maybe it’s not really water at all. There are so many possibilities, limited only by the bounds of your imagination…

Titans Grail by Jameswolf

“Titans Grail” by James Wolf

Medieval Monday: The Labors of March

plowingWarmer March weather meant it was time to finally put most indoor tasks aside and get out into the fields. There weren’t a great variety of tasks associated with March, mainly because preparing the fields for plowing and planting was such an onerous chore that began at dawn and ended at dusk.  Getting the spring grain into the ground was one of the most important tasks of the season.

Medieval farmers generally had a three field system, where each season one of the fields was left unplanted. But leaving it fallow didn’t mean there wasn’t any work involved. The fallow field would have to be plowed several times during the year to keep the weeds under control and at the same time enrich the earth with organic matter. Every time the field was plowed, new weeds would grow, and livestock would be sent out to graze on it, with the added benefit that they would fertilize it with manure as they went.

plowing-and-pruning-in-marchPruning vines and trees continued in March, as did calving. By the end of March, some of the calves were ready to be weaned, which meant milk became available once again. Cows whose calves had been weaned were milked twice per day. The same was true of sheep. Another important food source which returned to the medieval diet in March was eggs. Hens require at least 12 hours of daylight to produce, which meant they began laying around the spring equinox at the end of March, and ceased production around the autumn equinox at the end of September.

This week you can also enjoy another episode of “Tales from the Green Valley” which focuses on what daily life would have been like during the month of March. As I watched, I was reminded that even though certain jobs took priority in specific seasons, many of them happened to some degree all year round. In this video, you will see in action some of the tasks that have been mentioned in past Medieval Monday posts, such as threshing and winnowing, milling wheat into flour, sending pigs out to forage, playing games, and brewing ale and beer for every day drinking. You’ll get to see some period recipes being made as well (like what they did with all that dried, salted fish saved up for winter). Again, it’s worth setting aside half an hour to watch this BBC production. It makes for excellent research and really sends you back in time!



Use the Medieval Monday Index to discover more topics relating to daily life in the Middle Ages.

 

Inspiration Sunday!

Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18

 

Book Blast: A Powerful Rivalry

New Release

A Powerful Rivalry

by: K.M. Jenkins

“Let the council of the gods begin.”

“Great! About blasted time,” Kortez roared.

Gryphön rolled his eyes as he sat back in his seat. He looked over at Bright Star. “This will be a long one.”

She laughed and patted his hand. “It won’t be that long,” she said.

“Better not be, I have other things to do,” Kortez announced.

Serena tried to hold back the laughter that threatened to break through her lips. She loved the god of dwarves; he was always opinionated. Mortez looked at her with a smirk across his fine chiseled face. His eyes danced with mirth and made it clear he enjoyed the dwarf’s antics. Salza jumped up in her seat and did a twirl. Bright Star looked at her with annoyance. “That is if everyone will behave!”


JENKINS_2020_APR_NR_INSTAGRAMBANNER

The goddess Nütari rules alone over all the beasts in the Forest of Ferrês. She hoards the forest’s glory, keeping it only for herself and those few she trusts. But a young goddess, Serena, wants the freedom to walk through the forest and open its beauty to everyone. She is determined to change the Council of Gods’ laws.

Will she create a creature powerful enough to take the land by storm? Find out how this powerful rivalry between two goddesses began in the final installment in the Tales of Ferrês series.

Purchase Today for 99¢!


 

JENKINS_AUTHORPIC_2018K.M. Jenkins

K.M. Jenkins is a published international bestselling author that writes epic battles, forbidden romance, and tales of fantasy and adventure. She has a big love for the fantasy genre and loves dragons above all creatures.When she is not writing, you will find her chasing her twin boys around the house. Between the three she has epic battles throughout the day and nothing ever gets boring.

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